The teachings of gulob jamoon 

Just hearing the words gulob jamoon, a delicious dessert from India, could make one salivate. And if this means you have one foot out the door to the nearest Indian restaunt for an all-you-can-eat buffet, I don’t blame you. This dessert, as popular as it is, can be a cause for sorrow which we happened to discover this past year during yoga teacher training.

In April of 2016, I was talking to my teacher, Dr. Butera, about referring someone to YogaLife Institute for teacher training when he suggested that I do it in NJ. I was surprised, hesitant, unsure of how this would work out. I was aware he had helped other teachers begin their own teacher training programs. He proposed a few ideas on how I could collaborate with him, allowing the students to do a few required classes in PA and the rest with me in NJ.  I read through the requirements for the 250-hour teacher training that he had sent to help with the decision so the training could begin as soon as possible.

And it did.

We gathered first Monday after Labor day, 2016 to begin the year-long training to learn how to teach yoga. The first month was filled with questions about the curriculum, books required, essays to write, classes to attend – it all seemed daunting. As we took in each class, the lesson handouts appeared to fulfill the teaching prompts. And the questions that surfaced during the class fueled intense study and preparations for the following class.

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Essay Beginnings

What I can’t tell you is how gulob jamoon became the go-to example in this twelve-month training. We began with the study of Raja Yoga, the eight -fold path. And right off the bat, gulob jamoon appeared to fit right in as we studied the ten ethics of Yama and Niyama, the first two limbs. Ah, you have to join the teacher training to get the details on how we applied them to this dessert!

Each time we foccused on yoga philosophy, somehow it circled around to this dessert and all its ingredients and qualities. Studying philosophy required full attention to go beyond the literary meaning and comprehend its deeper essence and practical application. Certain topics led to difficult discussions provoking unsettling thoughts. We were glad gulob jamoon interjected itself at the right moments and brought lightheartedness to the fray without losing the seriousness of the message. In time, we came to realize that it symbolically represented various parts of the philosophy such as kama, desire, ahimsa, non-harming, aparigraha, non-hoarding, raga-dvesha, attachment/aversion, avidya, ignorance, asmita, ego/will power, etc., that were being addressed in the study.

Towards the end of the training we thought we had learnt a lot; the knowledge about the body through asana and nutrition, about the breath through pranayama, about the senses through pratyahara, about the mind through dharana, jnana yoga, and more – only to find that there is much more to learn as the past twelve months had just opened the door to the ocean of knowledge. In essence, we understood that just knowing the attributes of gulob jamoon, effects of its taste on the body and mind, etc., is not enough; especially if we continued to be a slave to our habit of eating it inspite of having the knowledge of its detrimental effects. Here is where we acknowledged that the tools of Raja Yoga can train the mind to release itself from its many habitual shackles.

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Books recommended for Teacher Training

We also understood – while bookish knowledge and intellectual gymnastics have their place in the scope of learning, practical application of the knowledge is critical in making progress in yoga and spiritual study. Besides getting a certificate of completion, the idea was to become aware that by using the yogic tools the body can learn to heal and purify itself, and help train the mind to police itself. And if – by bringing the mind repeatedly back to such an example meant we were motivated to use the tools of Raja Yoga in our daily practice, then –  gulob jamoon served it’s purpose well.

The sun showered its blessings on graduation day. We sat on our yoga mats, encircling an ancient lamp adorned with red roses (brought by Chetna): students and families passed around the “talking block” (decorated by Deepti) so each one could share their ups and downs, and compromises the families had to make to support their journeys. Amidst laughter and tears, we rejoiced a successful completion – rather a great beginning to a yogic way of living and learning.

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Place where we spent many hours of study and practice

Finally, having dangled this carrot (rather dessert) for twelve long months, it was demanded that this dessert be the dessert of choice for the graduation luncheon, along with an assortment of savory dishes (made by Manjula and others). Seated with our families around the table, we enjoyed a potluck of delicasies. Sharing various stories of how gulob jamun made its way into the yoga teacher training lessons, we took the first bite of this delicious brown ball (made by Kalyani) letting its sweetness trickle down to the soul of our being.

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Gulab Jamoon

Warnings of yogic discipline playing in our minds at this very moment? (some of us ignored it and went for seconds). That this delectable dessert found its way into yoga teacher training and then into our mouths to mark its final chapter was completely acceptable at that moment of celebration. Here is hoping the lessons learned in the practical application of the yoga philosophy using gulob jamoon will have its lasting effects!

September 2016 through August 2017 was a year committed to serious yoga study with a group of students who showed grit and grace in their work and their attitude. It was an honor to study with them and a pleasure to be a part of this Satsang, spiritual companionship. Much gratitude!

Thanks to Dr. Bob Butera for this opportunity to mentor these dedicated students and another chance to study Raja Yoga.

Smiling faces of the 250-Hour Yoga Teacher Graduates after successfully completing the teachings of gulob jamoon.

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From Left to Right – Kalyani, Deepti, Manjula and Chetna